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An anatomical view of gene expression

Vasudeva Ginjala

  • Correspondence: Vasudeva Ginjala

Author Affiliations

Genome Biology 2001, 2:reports2008  doi:10.1186/gb-2001-2-8-reports2008


The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://genomebiology.com/2001/2/8/reports/2008


Received:21 June 2001
Published:27 July 2001

© 2001 BioMed Central Ltd

Content

BodyMap is a database of human and mouse gene expression organized according to the anatomical origin of the tissue. The database holds a collection of site-directed 3'-expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that act as unique gene signatures (GSs). It contains much information on the expression of known and as-yet-unidentified human and mouse genes in different tissues and cell types. At present, the database contains 18,998 independent human GS clusters and 16,772 mouse GS clusters. The site includes facilities for searching the database for mRNA composition of the various tissue- and cell-type groupings, for searching for genes, and for selecting genes by their expression in different combinations of tissues and cell types. There is a link to Gene Resource Locator, which will give you the position of an EST on human or mouse chromosomes.

Navigation

The site is quick and responsive. The number of options is small, so it is difficult to get lost, but it would be helpful if every page had a link back to the home page. The site is printer-friendly; almost all of the pages are printable without a special application. No specific application is required for downloading the data.

Reporter's comments

Timeliness

The site was last modified on 1 September 2000. Data update is irregular but at least once a year, depending on the rate of data production.

Wish list

A site map would help to locate the different pages and the information for new users but, given the simplicity of the site, is not essential.

Related websites

Other websites that provide resources for analyzing gene expression in mouse or human are UniGene, REFSEQ, SAGE and the European Bioinformatics Institute - EST search.

Table of links

Assumptions made about all sites unless otherwise specified:
The site is free, in English and no registration is required. It is relatively quick to download, can be navigated by an 'intermediate' user, and no problems with connection were found. The site does not stipulate that any particular browser be used and no special software/plug-ins are required to view the site. There are relatively few gratuitous images and each page has its own URL, allowing it to be bookmarked.