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Paper report

Articles selected by Faculty of 1000: the origin of operons; human linkage disequilibrium maps; genomics finds novel secondary metabolites; complex epistasis of fly genes; how did the turtle get its shell?

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Genome Biology 2005, 6:328  doi:10.1186/gb-2005-6-6-328

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://genomebiology.com/2005/6/6/328/


Published:24 May 2005

© 2005 BioMed Central Ltd

The origin of operons

The origin and evolution of operons: the piecewise building of the proteobacterial histidine operon. Fani R, Brilli M, Liò P. J Mol Evol 2005, 60:378-390.

For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#Fani webcite

Human linkage disequilibrium maps

The linkage disequilibrium maps of three human chromosomes across four populations reflect their demographic history and a common underlying recombination pattern. De La Vega FM, Isaac H, Collins A, Scafe CR, Halldórsson BV, Su X, Lippert RA, Wang Y, Laig-Webster M, Koehler RT, et al. Genome Res 2005, 15:454-462.

For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#De webcite

Genomics finds novel secondary metabolites

Microbial genomics as a guide to drug discovery and structural elucidation: ECO-02301, a novel antifungal agent, as an example. McAlpine JB, Bachmann BO, Piraee M, Tremblay S, Alarco AM, Zazopoulos E, Farnet CM. J Nat Prod 2005, 68:493-496.

For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#McAlpine webcite

Complex epistasis of fly genes

Flexibility in a gene network affecting a simple behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. van Swinderen B, Greenspan RJ. Genetics 2005, 169:2151-2163.

For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#Swinderen webcite

How did the turtle get its shell?

Comprehensive survey of carapacial ridge-specific genes in turtle implies co-option of some regulatory genes in carapace evolution. Kuraku S, Usuda R, Kuratani S. Evol Dev 2005, 7:3-17.

For the Faculty of 1000 evaluation of this article please see: http://genomebiology.com/reports/F1000/gb-2005-6-6-328.asp#Kuraku webcite

Genome Biologypaper reports
Genome Biology aims to highlight significant research articles newly published in other journals. From 2003, individual paper reports have been replaced by summaries of articles of interest to Genome Biology readers, taken from those highlighted by Faculty of 1000, a new online literature awareness tool published by BioMed Central. Faculty of 1000 systematically and comprehensively reviews the most interesting recent articles published in the biological sciences on the basis of recommendations of a faculty of over 1,400 selected leading researchers.