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Highly Accessed Review

Direct sequencing of the human microbiome readily reveals community differences

Justin Kuczynski1, Elizabeth K Costello2, Diana R Nemergut3, Jesse Zaneveld1, Christian L Lauber4, Dan Knights5, Omry Koren6, Noah Fierer4, Scott T Kelley7, Ruth E Ley6, Jeffrey I Gordon8 and Rob Knight109*

Author affiliations

1 Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA

2 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

3 Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA

4 Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA

5 Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA

6 Department of Microbiology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA

7 Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA

8 Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA

9 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA

10 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA

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Citation and License

Genome Biology 2010, 11:210  doi:10.1186/gb-2010-11-5-210

Published: 5 May 2010

Abstract

Culture-independent studies of human microbiota by direct genomic sequencing reveal quite distinct differences among communities, indicating that improved sequencing capacity can be most wisely utilized to study more samples, rather than more sequences per sample.