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This article is part of the supplement: Beyond the Genome: The true gene count, human evolution and disease genomics

Poster presentation

CIPRO 2.5: Ciona intestinalis Protein Database - a unique integrated repository of large-scale omics data, bioinformatic analyses, and curated annotation, with ability for user rating and comments

Toshinori Endo1*, Keisuke Ueno1, Kouki Yonezawa1, Katsuhiko Mineta1, Kohji Hotta2, Yutaka Satou3, Lixy Yamada4, Michio Ogasawara5, Hiroki Takahashi6, Ayako Nakajima7, Mia Nakachi7, Mamoru Nomura7, Junko Yaguchi7, Alu Konno7, Yasunori Sasakura7, Akiyasu C Yoshizawa8, Hisaaki Taniguchi8, Chisato Yamasaki9, Miho Sera9, Tadashi Imanishi9 and Kazuo Inaba7

  • * Corresponding author: Toshinori Endo

Author affiliations

1 Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0814, Japan

2 Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522, Japan

3 Department of Zoology, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606 8502, Japan

4 Sugashima Marine Biological Laboratory, Nagoya University, 429-63 Sugashima, Toba 517-0004, Japan

5 Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiba University, Inage-Ku, Chiba 263-8522, Japan

6 National Institute for Basic Biology, Nishigonaka 38, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585, Japan

7 Shimoda Marine Research Center, University. of Tsukuba, 5-10-1 Shimoda, Shizuoka, 415-0025, Japan

8 Institute for Enzyme Research, the University of Tokushima, 3-18-15, Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503, Japan

9 Biomedicinal Information Research Center, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Waterfront Bio-IT Research Building, 2-42 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064, Japan

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Citation and License

Genome Biology 2010, 11(Suppl 1):P11  doi:10.1186/gb-2010-11-s1-p11


The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://genomebiology.com/2010/11/S1/P11


Published:11 October 2010

© 2010 Endo et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Poster presentation

CIPRO database (http://cipro.ibio.jp/2.5 webcite) is an integrated protein database for a tunicate species Ciona intestinalis that is part of the Urochordata. Although CIPRO provides proteomic and transcriptomic data on a single species, the animal is considered unique in the evolutionary tree, representing a possible origin of the vertebrates and is a good model for understanding chordate evolution, including human evolution. Furthermore, C. intestinalis has been one of the favorites of developmental biologists; therefore, a lot of amount of accumulated knowledge on its development, morphology, in addition to the recent genome sequence and gene expression data exists. The CIPRO database aims to collect published data and to present unique information, including the unpublished transcriptomic and proteomic data and human curated annotation, for the use of researchers in biology and bioinformatics. The current database contains 89,673 unique sequences covering all the proteins from all the gene models on this species; the number was reduced to 70,493 by similarity clustering. Of these sequences, more than 5,000 proteins are manually annotated based on the large-scale transcriptomic, proteomic and bioinformatic data. Those annotations can be subjected to be qualification by rating, curation, and comments by named and anonymous users through the web site of CIPRO database. Unique features of CIPRO database include:

(i) Original experimental data Unpublished experimental data, including 2D-PAGE with the identified protein spots by protein mass fingerprint (PMF) MS analysis, expressions or localizations of protein and RNA across developmental stages and tissues, altogether summarized in a single chart for the comparison among status and methods. RNA expressions are observed by microarray and EST. Each protein is linked to an independent Ascidian Proteome Database summarizing large-scale MS-based proteomic analyses.

(ii) Whole Ciona intestinalis proteome database Proteins across gene models are presented: all protein models derived from published gene models are incorporated, including Kyoto model (KG), KH (successor of KG model), PROCITS, JGI's versions 1 and 2, and Ensembl (version 58.2) are incorporated. Identical sequences across gene models are shown.

(iii) Original comprehensive user-friendly interfaces Bioinformatic analyses and prediction results are summarized in pictures for grasp at a glance: homology search, cytolocalization, secondary structure prediction combined with modification sites, such include phosphorylation and three-dimensional structures.

(iv) Comparative analysis data for disease association Comparison with human genome: map location of human homologues is graphically shown with associated disease information. Comparative data for other model organisms are also included.

(v) Community-wide curation capability opened to users To facilitate progressive improvement of annotation by visited users, users can place additional annotation for the protein name and/or comments, which will be subjected to rating by the followed data viewers. To aid curation by wide community, information for literature and essence of matched motif patterns and other related protein information are shown with the links.

(vi) Useful search facilities Various search methods are provided including blast homology, free text, partial sequence, protein mass fragment, and cross item searches.