Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from Genome Biology and BioMed Central.

Open Access Highly Accessed Research

Genomewide characterization of non-polyadenylated RNAs

Li Yang13, Michael O Duff1, Brenton R Graveley1, Gordon G Carmichael1 and Ling-Ling Chen12*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut Stem Cell Institute, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Ave, Farmington, CT 06030-6403, USA

2 State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 320 Yue Yang Road, Shanghai 200031, PR China

3 Current address: Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 320 Yue Yang Road, Shanghai 200031, PR China

For all author emails, please log on.

Genome Biology 2011, 12:R16  doi:10.1186/gb-2011-12-2-r16

Published: 16 February 2011

Abstract

Background

RNAs can be physically classified into poly(A)+ or poly(A)- transcripts according to the presence or absence of a poly(A) tail at their 3' ends. Current deep sequencing approaches largely depend on the enrichment of transcripts with a poly(A) tail, and therefore offer little insight into the nature and expression of transcripts that lack poly(A) tails.

Results

We have used deep sequencing to explore the repertoire of both poly(A)+ and poly(A)- RNAs from HeLa cells and H9 human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Using stringent criteria, we found that while the majority of transcripts are poly(A)+, a significant portion of transcripts are either poly(A)- or bimorphic, being found in both the poly(A)+ and poly(A)- populations. Further analyses revealed that many mRNAs may not contain classical long poly(A) tails and such messages are overrepresented in specific functional categories. In addition, we surprisingly found that a few excised introns accumulate in cells and thus constitute a new class of non-polyadenylated long non-coding RNAs. Finally, we have identified a specific subset of poly(A)- histone mRNAs, including two histone H1 variants, that are expressed in undifferentiated hESCs and are rapidly diminished upon differentiation; further, these same histone genes are induced upon reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells.

Conclusions

We offer a rich source of data that allows a deeper exploration of the poly(A)- landscape of the eukaryotic transcriptome. The approach we present here also applies to the analysis of the poly(A)- transcriptomes of other organisms.